Santa Maria in Cosmedin: A Roman Water Fountain Worth Seeing

Archaeologists and restorers alike have stumbled upon a wealth of pagan and Christian relics on the grounds of Santa Maria in Cosmedin in Rome. The Bocca della Verità (Mouth of Truth} is a renowned marble sculpture situated in the portico of the nearby basilica. Built in 1719, the Santa Maria in Cosmedin fountain was relatively unknown and situated far from sight making it difficult to visit. For the most part, visitors stayed away from the area because it was a drab and desolate part of the city. It was a this time that Pope Clement XI mandated the Italian architect Carlo Bizzaccheri to put up a fountain to modernize the square outside the church of Santa Maria in Cosmedin. 6277-10204__83093.jpg August 11, 1717 marked the date when work on the church’s infrastructure commenced. The consecration of the first stone to be placed in the foundation was followed by medals being tossed in showing the images of the Blessed Virgin, for whom the church is named, and St. John the Baptist, the patron saint of water.

Garden Water Fountain Builders Through History

Often serving as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and cultivated scholars all in one, from the 16th to the later part of the 18th century, fountain designers were multi-faceted individuals, During the Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci illustrated the creator as a imaginative intellect, creator and scientific virtuoso. With his immense fascination concerning the forces of nature, he investigated the qualities and mobility of water and also carefully documented his findings in his now much celebrated notebooks. Early Italian fountain engineers transformed private villa settings into inventive water displays complete of emblematic meaning and natural elegance by coupling imagination with hydraulic and gardening expertise. The humanist Pirro Ligorio, renowned for his virtuosity in archeology, architecture and garden design, provided the vision behind the wonders in Tivoli. Masterminding the extraordinary water marbles, water features and water jokes for the various properties near Florence, other fountain designers were well versed in humanistic issues as well as ancient scientific texts.

Keeping Your Fountain Tidy

In order to ensure that water fountains last a while, it is important to practice regular maintenance. It is essential to clean it out and get rid of any debris or foreign objects that might have dropped into or onto it. Additionally, anywhere light from the sun combines with still water, algae can appear. To avoid this, there are some common ingredients that can be added into the water, such as vinegar, sea salt, or hydrogen peroxide. There are those who like to use bleach, but that is dangerous to any animals that might drink or bathe in the water - so should therefore be avoided.

Experts suggest that the typical garden fountain undergoes a thorough scrubbing every 3-4 months. First off you must remove the water. Then use gentle and a soft sponge to clean the innner part of the reservoir. If there are any little grooves, use a toothbrush to get every spot. Be sure to completely rinse the interior of the fountain to make sure all the soap is gone.

Numerous organisms and calcium deposits may get inside the pump, so it is best to take it apart and clean it completely. You might want to let it soak in vinegar for a few hours to make it much less difficult to clean. Mineral or rain water, versus tap water, is ideal in order to prevent any build-up of chemicals inside the pump.

Lastly, make sure your fountain is always full by checking on it every day - this will keep it in tip-top shape. Permitting the water level to get too low can result in damage to the pump - and you certainly don't want that!

The Prevalence of Water Elements in Japanese Backyards

No Japanese garden is complete without a water element. They tend to be located right at the entrance of Japanese temples and homes because they are regarded as being representative of spiritual and physical cleansing. Since water is the most important component of any Japanese fountain, the design is normally simple.

You will also see many fountains that have spouts crafted of bamboo. The basin, which tends to be fashioned of stones, collects the water as it trickles down from the bamboo spout. People usually make them seem weathered and worn, even when they are new. It is important that the overall look of the fountain fits in with the natural environment, so people typically place plants, rocks, and flowers around it.

Clearly this fountain is much more than just a pretty add-on.

If you are hoping for another sort of look and feel, you can also get a fountain built of stone, place it in a bed of gravel, and decorate it with natural stones and live bamboo. In time, as moss gradually covers the rocks, it starts to look even more natural-looking.

If you are blessed enough to have a big section of open land you can create a water feature that is much more elaborate. Give some thought to adding a beautiful final touch like a pond filled with koi or a tiny stream.

Japanese fountains, on the other hand, do not actually need to have water in them. Good options include stones, gravel, or sand to represent water. You can also assemble flat stones and place them close enough together that they look like water in motion.

The First Water Fountains recorded in Human History.

Towns and communities depended on practical water fountains to channel water for cooking, washing, and cleaning from local sources like lakes, streams, or creeks. A source of water higher in elevation than the fountain was required to pressurize the movement and send water squirting from the fountain's spout, a technology without equal until the late 19th century.

Commonly used as monuments and commemorative structures, water fountains have inspired travelers from all over the globe throughout the centuries. If you saw the first fountains, you wouldn't identify them as fountains. Created for drinking water and ceremonial reasons, the 1st fountains were simple carved stone basins. Stone basins are believed to have been 1st utilized around 2,000 BC. Gravity was the power source that controlled the earliest water fountains. These historic fountains were designed to be functional, frequently situated along aqueducts, streams and waterways to supply drinking water. Wildlife, Gods, and Spiritual figures dominated the very early ornate Roman fountains, beginning to appear in about 6 BC. The Romans had an elaborate system of aqueducts that delivered the water for the many fountains that were placed throughout the city.


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