The Godfather Of Roman Outdoor Fountains

In Rome’s city center, there are countless famous public fountains. One of the finest sculptors and artists of the 17th century, virtually all of them were planned, conceptualized and built by Gian Lorenzo Bernini. ft-309__05979.jpg He was also a urban architect, in addition to his skills as a water fountain developer, and traces of his life's work are apparent all through the streets of Rome. To totally exhibit their skill, chiefly in the form of community water features and water features, Bernini's father, a celebrated Florentine sculptor, guided his young son, and they eventually moved in Rome. The young Bernini was an great employee and won compliments and patronage of significant artists as well as popes. He was originally recognized for his sculpture. Working effortlessly with Roman marble, he used a base of expertise in the historical Greek architecture, most famously in the Vatican. Though he was influenced by many, Michelangelo had the most serious impact on him, both personally and professionally.

Outdoor Water Fountains And Obesity

The first example of a sugary drinks tax in the USA came in February 2014, when it was passed by the city of Berkley, California. By taxing sugary drinks, the city hopes to motivate more people to decide on healthier choices, such as water. Efforts were made to find out the state of community drinking water fountains in both high- and low-income neighborhoods. By creating a mobile GPS application, experts were able to get data on Berkley’s drinking water fountains. This info was cross-referenced with demographic records on race and income obtained from the US Census Community Study database. The two data sets were compared to figure out what class variances, if any, there were in access to operating water fountains. Each water fountain and the demographics of its nearby area were analyzed to reveal whether the site of the fountains or their level of maintenance revealed any correlation to income, race, or other points.

The cleanliness of numerous fountains was found poor, even if most were operating.

Rome’s Early Water Transport Solutions

Rome’s first raised aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in 273 BC; prior to that, inhabitants residing at higher elevations had to rely on local creeks for their water. When aqueducts or springs weren’t easily accessible, people living at higher elevations turned to water removed from underground or rainwater, which was made possible by wells and cisterns. From the early sixteenth century, water was routed to Pincian Hill through the subterranean channel of Acqua Vergine. The aqueduct’s channel was made available by pozzi, or manholes, that were installed along its length when it was initially created. The manholes made it more straightforward to maintain the channel, but it was also achievable to use buckets to remove water from the aqueduct, as we observed with Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi when he possessed the property from 1543 to 1552, the year he passed away. Despite the fact that the cardinal also had a cistern to collect rainwater, it didn’t supply enough water. Thankfully, the aqueduct sat under his residence, and he had a shaft opened to give him accessibility.

A Short History of Water Garden Fountains

As initially developed, fountains were crafted to be practical, directing water from creeks or aqueducts to the inhabitants of towns and villages, where the water could be used for cooking, washing, and drinking. The force of gravity was the power supply of water fountains up until the conclusion of the 19th century, using the potent power of water traveling downhill from a spring or creek to force the water through valves or other outlets. The beauty and wonder of fountains make them ideal for historical memorials. The contemporary fountains of modern times bear little similarity to the very first water fountains. The 1st accepted water fountain was a stone basin carved that was used as a container for drinking water and ceremonial functions. 2000 B.C. is when the oldest known stone fountain basins were originally used. The first civilizations that made use of fountains relied on gravity to drive water through spigots. Drinking water was delivered by public fountains, long before fountains became decorative public monuments, as beautiful as they are practical. Fountains with flowery decoration began to appear in Rome in approximately 6 B.C., usually gods and animals, made with stone or bronze.

Water for the community fountains of Rome arrived to the city via a intricate system of water aqueducts.

The Advantages of a Fountain in Your Office

Most customers think water fountains are a great addition to a business. Increasing traffic flow and differentiating yourself from the competitors are just some of the advantages of having a water fountain in your place of work. Yoga studios, bookstores, coffee shops, salons, and other retail spaces are great places to install a water feature. The right water fountain will provide a relaxing ambiance to a business where people enjoy meeting outdoors. Bars or a restaurants that include a water feature will be appealing to those who are seeking a romantic setting.


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