A Short History of Outdoor Fountains

Towns and villages relied on functional water fountains to funnel water for preparing food, washing, and cleaning up from nearby sources like lakes, channels, or creeks. In the days before electrical power, the spray of fountains was powered by gravity exclusively, often using an aqueduct or water supply located far away in the nearby mountains. 6059-6801__52360.jpg Frequently used as monuments and commemorative structures, water fountains have inspired people from all over the world throughout the ages. The contemporary fountains of today bear little similarity to the very first water fountains. Designed for drinking water and ceremonial purposes, the first fountains were very simple carved stone basins. The original stone basins are presumed to be from about 2000 BC. The spraying of water appearing from small jets was pressured by gravity, the sole power source builders had in those days. Located near reservoirs or springs, the functional public water fountains supplied the local citizens with fresh drinking water. Fountains with ornamental Gods, mythological monsters, and creatures began to show up in Rome in about 6 BC, crafted from rock and bronze. Water for the public fountains of Rome arrived to the city via a elaborate system of water aqueducts.

Your Pet Cat and Water Elements They Can Enjoy

Is your cat attracted to the sound of running water in the sink? Does he reach into the toilet or touch the water in his bowl before putting his face in it? Strange as these behaviors sound, they in fact show a cat’s natural instinct to avoid still standing water. Generally, they do not consume standing water.

In nature, cats tend to take in moisture-rich meat, which means they do not need to regularly seek out water. Therefore, felines do not have a natural craving for much water. That said, domesticated cats do in fact need extra water, so it is up to you to provide it. With a cat fountain, you can be sure your cat has plenty of water available.

Limitless fresh water will continually be available to your pet if you install one. You can choose one you know your cat will enjoy since they come in so many different versions. Some fountains are basically a bowl which refills automatically while others supply fresher water due to their constant flow.

The Prevalence of Water Elements in Japanese Backyards

No Japanese garden is complete without a water element. They tend to be located right at the entrance of Japanese temples and homes because they are regarded as being representative of spiritual and physical cleansing. Since water is the most essential component of any Japanese fountain, the design is generally simple.

You will also find many fountains that have spouts made of bamboo. The basin, which tends to be built of stones, receives the water as it trickles down from the bamboo spout. It must have a worn-down, weathered look as well. People want their fountain to seem as natural as possible, so they place plants, flowers, and stones around the fountain. As you can likely guess, this fountain is symbolic rather than purely decorative.

If you are hoping for another sort of look and feel, you can also get a fountain crafted of stone, place it in a bed of gravel, and decorate it with natural stones and live bamboo. After some years it starts to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss grows over the stone.

Anyone who has an extensive space to work with can, of course, install a much bigger water feature. Charming add-ons include a babbling creek or tiny pool with koi in it.

Water, however, does not have to be used in a Japanese fountain. It is acceptable to use representations of water in lieu of real water, such as sand, rocks, or natural stones.

Natural rocks that are flat and laid out tightly together can be used to produce the illusion of moving water.

A Few Good Ways to Mount a Wall Fountain

Wall features can enhance any space. The benefits of the water sounds include bringing tranquility and calm to the room. While any area will benefit from a wall fountain, they are most often put in entryways. Although the instructions for hanging one are fairly straightforward there will be small modifications depending on the model. There are normally several pieces that need to be assembled. Once you attach the foundation and the top you will then need to attach the pump and the water tubes. Be sure to review the directions before starting to make sure it is done right.

The set-up technique is quite simple to understand. Be aware, though, that the model you have might require a somewhat different process. The easiest way to ensure it is positioned correctly is to recruit another person to hold it where you want it while you mark the wall. To ensure a proper line, use a level. It is recommended to mark both the bottom and the top positions. There is more than one technique to mount a wall fountain. There are slots on the back which can be hung onto the screws you put on the wall. Alternatively, you might want to affix brackets to the wall and use those. The bracket option is better, specifically for wall fountains that are big and bulky. Determine where the brackets need to be placed and mark the wall as required. Drill pilot holes in the wall where you need to position the drywall anchors. Gently hammer the anchors into your wall. Hold the brackets in position on the wall and use a cordless drill or screwdriver to affix them. It is now time to hang your wall fountain onto the mounting brackets. Make sure that it is properly aligned and not loose. Water can be added as soon as the fountain has been positioned. Use sufficient water so that the pump is completely submerged. It is now time to plug it in and watch the water trickle. The water should fill the basin to within an inch of the top. Note that it will overflow when not pumping if you fill it to the top edge.

The water level will rise because it all settles at the bottom of the basin when not being pumped. Harm can be be the result if the water is overly full and overflows down your wall.

Keep Your Outdoor Garden Fountain Clean

To ensure that water fountains last a while, it is vital to practice regular maintenance. A common problem with fountains is that they tend to gather dirt and debris, so it is vital that you keep it free from this. On top of that, algae can be a challenge, because sunshine hitting the water permits it to form quickly. To prevent this, take vinegar, hydrogen peroxide, or sea salt and add right into the water. Some people opt for putting bleach into the water, but the downside is that it harms wildlife - so it should be avoided.

Experts recommend that the typical garden fountain undergoes a thorough scouring every 3-4 months. Before you can start washing it you need to drain out all of the water. Then use a soft cloth and mild cleanser to scrub the inside. If there is intricate artwork, you might need to use a toothbrush for those hard-to-reach areas. Make sure all the soap is completely cleaned off.

Make sure you get rid of any calcium or plankton by taking the pump apart and cleaning the inside properly. To make it less difficult, soak it in vinegar overnight before cleaning. If you want to eliminate build-up in your fountain, use rain water or mineral water versus tap water, as these don’t contain any elements that will stick to the inside of the pump.

Finally, be sure to have a quick look at your fountain every day and add water if you see that the level is low. Allowing the water to go below the pump’s intake level, can cause severe damage and even make the pump burn out - an undesired outcome!


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