Reasons to Think About Putting in a Pondless Water Fountain in your Garden

The name “pondless fountain” is one other way to refer to a disappearing fountain. The water rises from an underground supply, hence the name. 6042-3103__81410.jpg Any area where there are people, such as a walking path, is perfect for a disappearing fountain since it adds calming sounds and a lovely visual effect. There are many kinds of them including millstones, ceramic urns, granite columns, and natural-looking waterfalls.

A disappearing fountain could be the most appropriate choice for you for a number of reasons. Since the water source is below ground, there is no open water to pose a threat to those around it. As a result, it poses no threat to children. Additionally, due to the fact that water is located underground, none of it is lost to evaporation. Other types of fountains use more water due to evaporation. This type of fountain is perfect if you do not have a lot of time to clean it often since neither dirt nor algae can reach it underground. Finally, you can install one just about anywhere since it takes up so little space.

Aqueducts: The Remedy to Rome's Water Troubles

With the construction of the 1st elevated aqueduct in Rome, the Aqua Anio Vetus in 273 BC, individuals who lived on the city’s hills no longer had to be dependent exclusively on naturally-occurring spring water for their demands. When aqueducts or springs weren’t accessible, people living at raised elevations turned to water taken from underground or rainwater, which was made available by wells and cisterns. In the very early sixteenth century, the city began to make use of the water that flowed below ground through Acqua Vergine to furnish water to Pincian Hill. As originally constructed, the aqueduct was provided along the length of its channel with pozzi (manholes) constructed at regular intervals. Whilst these manholes were manufactured to make it easier to preserve the aqueduct, it was also feasible to use containers to remove water from the channel, which was done by Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi from the time he acquired the property in 1543 to his death in 1552. Even though the cardinal also had a cistern to accumulate rainwater, it couldn't produce sufficient water. To provide himself with a much more practical means to gather water, he had one of the manholes exposed, giving him access to the aqueduct below his residence.

Selecting the Best Spot for Your Fountain

Before picking out a water fountain, take some time to think about precisely where you want to put it. Roundabouts and entryways are ideal spots for them.

There are models such as wall fountains made especially to be positioned against a flat surface. If you check the back, you will find a bar or some other piece to secure it against a wall, grate or fence. There are many natural hazards such as wind or animals which can knock over your fountain if you do not securely affix it to the wall, so do not fail to do this as soon as possible.

Anywhere people gather to sit and take in the fresh air is ideal for another option, a garden sculpture style.

The Last Inclusion to the Gardens of Chatsworth: "Revelation" Fountain

Angela Conner, the widely known British sculptor, designed “Revelation,” the latest acquisition to the appealing outdoor fountains of Chatsworth. She was mandated by the late 11th Duke of Devonshire to create a limited edition bust of Queen Elizabeth, in 2004/5 in commemoration of the Queen’s 80th birthday. Jack Pond, one of Chatsworth’s oldest ponds, had “Revelation” placed in 1999. Taking on the form of four big flower petals which open and close with the flow of water, the metal water fountain alternately conceals and reveals a gold colored globe at the center of the sculpture. A metal globe decorated with gold dust was integrated into the sculpture, which rests five meters high and five meters wide. The petals move depending on the circulation of water, making this installation an interesting addition to the Chatsworth Garden grounds.

The Globe's Tallest Water Elements

Jeddah, Saudi Arabia has the highest continuously- running water fountain known as the King Fahd Fountain (1985). The water reaches the amazing height of 260 meters (853 feet) above the Red Sea.

Reaching water heights of 202 meters (663 feet), the World Cup Fountain in the Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), is recognized as the second highest worldwide.

Located near the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri, is 3rd placed Gateway Geyser (1995). This fountain is regarded as the tallest in the United States with water reaching up to 192 meters (630 feet).

The next on the list is Port Fountain located in Karachi, Pakistan which rockets water 190 meters (620 feet) into the sky.

Number 4 is Water at Fountain Park (1970) situated in Fountain Hills, Arizona - it can attain up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are working, even though it typically only reaches up to 91 meters (300 feet).

The Dubai Fountain which made its debut in 2009 is situated next to tallest building worldwide, the famous Burj Khalifa. The fountain propels water up to 73 meters (240 feet) and performs once every half hour to pre-recorded music - and even has extreme shooters, not used in every show, which reach up to 150 meters (490 feet).

Propelling water up to 147 meters (482 feet) high, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet (1970) in Canberra, Australia, comes in seventh.

And finally we have the Jet d'eau, in Geneva (1951) which measures 140 meters (460 feet) in height.


The Newest Addition to the Chatsworth Gardens: Revelation Fountain
Angela Conner, the widely known British sculptor, designed “Revelation,” the newest acquisition to the ornamental exterior fountains of Chatsworth. She was mandated by the now deceased 11th Duke of Devonshire to create a limited edition bust of Queen Elizabeth, in... read more
The City Of Rome, Gian Bernini, And Fountains
There are countless famous fountains in Rome’s city center. Gian Lorenzo Bernini, one of the greatest sculptors and artists of the 17th... read more
Agrippa's Amazing, but Mostly Forgotten Water-Lifting Device
The praise Agrippa’s water-lifting creation was given from Andrea Bacci in 1588 was short-lived. It may be that in 1592 when Rome’s latest channel, the Acqua Felice, began providing the Villa Medici, there... read more