Fountains: Pets, Flying Friends and You

Putting in an outdoor water fountain or a bird feeder will allow you to delight in the natural presence of wildlife or pets. or-145__60095.jpg Drinking, bathing, and grooming are some of the things birds need to do. Birds such as robins, thrushes, orioles, or warblers are usually attracted to the moving water of fountains. While bowl-shaped bird baths can be dull to many birds, fountains are more enticing because of the moving water they generate. Birds are highly attracted to the trickling and splashing music produced.

Dogs are drawn to fountains mainly because they provide drinking water. Dogs and cats will be outside looking out for clean water during hot weather. Constantly moving water is also going to require much less cleaning than a still bowl of water from a birdbath, which collects debris.

Inventors of the First Water Features

Water fountain designers were multi-talented individuals from the 16th to the late 18th century, often serving as architects, sculptors, artisans, engineers and cultivated scholars all in one. Exemplifying the Renaissance artist as a innovative genius, Leonardo da Vinci performed as an inventor and scientific specialist. He methodically registered his examinations in his now much celebrated notebooks about his research into the forces of nature and the properties and movement of water. Converting private villa settings into ingenious water exhibits full of symbolic significance and natural wonder, early Italian water feature creators fused imagination with hydraulic and horticultural abilities. The magnificence in Tivoli were provided by the humanist Pirro Ligorio, who was widely known for his capabilities in archeology, architecture and garden design. Masterminding the fascinating water marbles, water attributes and water pranks for the numerous properties near Florence, some other fountain engineers were well versed in humanist themes as well as ancient scientific texts.

Aspects of Outdoor Sculpture in Archaic Greece

Up until the Archaic Greeks introduced the 1st freestanding sculpture, a phenomenal achievement, carvings had mainly been accomplished in walls and pillars as reliefs. Kouros figures, statues of adolescent, good-looking male or female (kore) Greeks, made up the bulk of the statues. The kouroi were seen by the Greeks to embody beauty and were sculpted with one foot leading and an uncompromising rigidity to their forward-facing poses; the male statues were always strapping, sinewy, and undressing. The kouroi started to be life-sized starting in 650 BC. During the Archaic period, a great time of changes, the Greeks were developing new types of government, expressions of art, and a better comprehension of people and cultures outside Greece. Throughout this time and other durations of historical tumultuousness, clashes often occurred, most notably battles fought between city-states such as the Arcadian wars and the Spartan infiltration of Samos.

The World’s Most Amazing Fountains

The King Fahd Fountain (built in 1985) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, has the tallest consistently-running fountain on the planet. It spouts out water reaching 260 meters (853 feet) above the Red Sea.

The Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), comes in 2nd with water levels of 202 meters (663 feet).

Located next to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri, is third placed Gateway Geyser (1995). This fountain is regarded as the tallest in the U.S. with water reaching up to 192 meters (630 feet).

The next on the list is Port Fountain located in Karachi, Pakistan which shoots water 190 meters (620 feet) into the sky.

Number 4: On a typical day the water is limited to 91 meters (300 feet) at the Fountain Park feature in Fountain Hills, Arizona, but it is capable of pushing water up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are operating.

The Dubai Fountain made its first appearance in 2009 close to the tallest building in the world, the Burj Khalifa. It dances to pre-recorded music every half hour and rockets water to the height of 73 meters (240 feet) - it also has extreme shooters which reach 150 meters (490 feet), though these are only used on special occasions.

Number 7 is the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet in Canberra, finished in 1970, propelling water 147 meters (482 feet) high.

The last impressive fountain to make the list is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, measuring 140 meters (460 feet).

Wall Fountains: The Minoan Civilization

A variety of kinds of conduits have been found through archaeological excavations on the island of Crete, the cradle of Minoan civilization. They not solely aided with the water supply, they eliminated rainwater and wastewater as well. Most were prepared from clay or rock. When prepared from clay, they were generally in the format of canals and round or rectangle-shaped pipes. These incorporated cone-like and U-shaped terracotta pipes which were exclusive to the Minoans. Terracotta piping were installed below the flooring at Knossos Palace and utilized to circulate water. Along with disbursing water, the terracotta pipes of the Minoans were also made use of to collect water and accumulate it. To make this achievable, the piping had to be designed to handle: Underground Water Transportation: This hidden process for water movement could possibly have been employed to give water to specific individuals or occasions. Quality Water Transportation: Bearing in mind the proof, several scholars suggest that these pipes were not linked to the popular water delivery system, supplying the castle with water from a different source.


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