Wall Fountains: The Minoan Civilization

During archaeological excavations on the island of Crete, a variety of kinds of conduits have been found. They were used for water supply as well as removal of storm water and wastewater. The main materials employed were stone or terracotta. p-671__53154.jpg Terracotta was utilized for canals and pipelines, both rectangle-shaped and round. Among these were terracotta conduits which were U shaped or a shortened, cone-like shape which have only appeared in Minoan society. Terracotta water lines were laid under the floor surfaces at Knossos Palace and used to distribute water. The piping also had other functions such as amassing water and diverting it to a central site for storing. To make this feasible, the pipelines had to be tailored to handle: Subterranean Water Transportation: It is not quite understood why the Minoans wanted to move water without it being spotted. Quality Water Transportation: There is also proof that suggests the piping being utilized to supply water features independently of the local technique.

The Outcome of the Norman Conquest on Anglo-Saxon Garden Design

The advent of the Normans in the later half of the 11th century substantially modified The Anglo-Saxon ways of living. Engineering and gardening were attributes that the Normans excelled in, trumping that of the Anglo-Saxons at the time of the occupation. However, there was no time for home life, domesticated architecture, and adornment until the Normans had overcome the whole region. Monasteries and castles served different purposes, so while monasteries were massive stone structures assembled in only the most fruitful, wide dales, castles were set upon blustery knolls where the people focused on learning offensive and defensive strategies. Tranquil activities such as gardening were out of place in these desolate citadels. Berkeley Castle is probably the most intact model in existence today of the early Anglo-Norman form of architecture. It is said that the keep was developed during William the Conqueror's time.

An enormous terrace encompasses the building, serving as an impediment to assailants intending to excavate under the castle walls. One of these terraces, a charming bowling green, is covered grass and flanked by an old yew hedge cut into the shape of crude battlements.

Design a Garden Fountain as a Celebratory Piece

Put up a garden fountain in honor of someone who is deceased. Many old customs have been done away with in today’s society. Memorializing loved ones who have passed is still the norm, however. Some memorials might include a number of personal items. They come in many shapes and sizes, and backyard garden fountains are quite popular. Adding personal items such as photos or a nameplate, planting a tree, or holding annual remembrance ceremonies at the fountain will make the garden fountain more unique to your loved one.

Garden fountains enable you to pay homage to loved ones you have lost. The flowing of water through the fountain represents the luck and affluence of your loved one and can also be part of the honoring of their life. Whatever sort of garden fountain you pick as a memorial, make sure it is sturdy, high quality, and able to tolerate any type of weather. You want to make sure your garden fountain is going to endure once you get it put in.

The Importance of Water Features in Japanese Landscapes

You will seldom see a Japanese garden that does not feature a water feature. The Japanese water fountain is considered representative of spiritual and physical purifying, so it is typically placed in or near the doorways of temples or homes. Since water is supposed to be the central point of a fountain, you will notice that the designs are kept very straightforward.

You will also see many fountains that have spouts crafted of bamboo.

The basin, which tends to be fashioned of stones, receives the water as it flows down from the bamboo spout. It must have a worn-down, weathered look and feel as well. People want their fountain to appear as natural as possible, so they place plants, flowers, and stones around the fountain. To the owner of the fountain, it clearly is more than just attractive decor.

If you want to get a bit more creative, try a stone fountain enhanced with live bamboo and other natural elements placed on a bed of gravel. The idea is that over time it will start to look more and more like a natural part of the landscape, as moss slowly grows over the stones.

Larger water features can be created if there is enough open land. Charming add-ons include a babbling creek or tiny pool with koi in it.

Water, nevertheless, does not have to be used in a Japanese fountain. Attractive rocks, sand, or gravel are good alternatives to actual water, as they can be used to represent the water. Natural rocks that are flat and laid out tightly together can be used to produce the illusion of flowing water.

Where did Large Garden Fountains Begin?

The incredible construction of a fountain allows it to provide clean water or shoot water high into air for dramatic effect and it can also serve as an excellent design feature to complement your home.

The main purpose of a fountain was originally strictly functional. Cities, towns and villages made use of nearby aqueducts or springs to provide them with drinking water as well as water where they could bathe or wash. Up to the late 19th century, water fountains had to be near an aqueduct or reservoir and higher than the fountain so that gravity could make the water flow down or jet high into the air. Artists thought of fountains as amazing additions to a living space, however, the fountains also served to provide clean water and honor the artist responsible for creating it.

The main components used by the Romans to create their fountains were bronze or stone masks, mostly depicting animals or heroes. Muslims and Moorish landscaping designers of the Middle Ages included fountains to re-create smaller models of the gardens of paradise. To demonstrate his dominance over nature, French King Louis XIV included fountains in the Garden of Versailles. The Popes of the 17th and 18th centuries were extolled with baroque style fountains constructed to mark the arrival points of Roman aqueducts.

Since indoor plumbing became the standard of the day for fresh, drinking water, by the end of the 19th century urban fountains were no longer needed for this purpose and they became purely ornamental. Gravity was replaced by mechanical pumps in order to enable fountains to bring in clean water and allow for amazing water displays.

Contemporary fountains are used to embellish public spaces, honor individuals or events, and enrich recreational and entertainment events.


Did You Know How Mechanical Designs of Water Fountains Became Known?
The circulated documents and illustrated publications of the time contributed to the advancements of scientific technology, and were the primary means of transmitting... read more
The Father Of Roman Garden Fountain Design And Style
In Rome’s city center, there are many famous water features. Almost all of them were planned, architected and constructed by one of the... read more
Water Transport Strategies in Early Rome
With the construction of the very first raised aqueduct in Rome, the Aqua Anio Vetus in 273 BC, individuals who lived on the city’s foothills no longer had to depend only on naturally-occurring spring water for their needs. Over this period, there were only 2... read more