Kitties and Water Fountains They Can Enjoy

Whenever your cat hears water running in the kitchen, does he come running? Does he check the water in his bowl with his foot or drink toilet water? Cats tend to prefer water that is running, as this behavior demonstrates. As a matter of fact, they do not posses a strong natural tendency to hydrate. s-503__35306.jpg

Untamed cats get sufficient moisture from the meat they ingest. For this reason, an intuitive need for water never evolved in felines. Owner's of a household cat, on the other hand, need to make sure their cats get enough water because it is an important part of their overall health. To maintain a good water source for your pet, get it a cat fountain.

Having one will ensure your pet has plenty of water around whenever it wants to drink. The variety of different models will let you to choose a fountain best suited to your cat. One type of fountain has regularly flowing water for maximum freshness whereas others have water which is repeatedly refilled when the bowl is empty.

The Famous Revelation Fountain at Chatsworth

“Revelation,” the most recent inclusion to the decorative garden fountains of Chatsworth, was created by renowned British sculptor Angela Conner.

In 2004/2005 she was commissioned by the late 11th Duke of Devonshire to create a limited edition bust of Queen Elizabeth, in brass and steel, for the Queen’s 80th birthday celebration. In 1999 Revelation was placed in Jack Pond, one of Chatsworth’s first ponds. It takes on the configuration of four large flower petals designed from steel which opens and close with the water circulation, alternately camouflaging and revealing a gold colored globe at the sculpture’s heart. Standing five meters high and five meters wide, the globe was built from steel and then coated with gold dust. This newest fountain is an intriguing and interesting addition to the Chatsworth Gardens, unique in that the movement of the petals is entirely powered by water.

Can Garden Fountains Help Purify The Air?

If what you are after is to breathe life into an otherwise uninspiring ambiance, an indoor wall fountain can be the answer. Your senses and your wellness can benefit from the putting in of one of these indoor features. If you doubt the benefits of water fountains, just look at the science supporting this idea. The negative ions generated by water features are offset by the positive ions released by contemporary conveniences. The negative ions generated by these kinds of water features overtake the positive ones ending in positive shifts to both your psychological and physical wellness. The increased serotonin levels arising from these types of features make people more attentive, serene and energized. The negative ions produced by indoor wall fountains foster a better mood as well as get rid of air impurities from your home. Water features also help in eliminating allergens, pollutants among other types of irritants. And lastly, dust particles and microbes in the air are eliminated and lead to improved health.

The Many Designs in Outdoor Water Fountains

Gardens allow you to retreat into nature and be outside when you want. Even though there is a lot of work involved in getting a new one designed and built, it is worth the effort for anyone who will be using it. The value of your home will appreciate with a lovely garden area, as it will boost the “curb appeal” of the property.

Many people choose to add to their landscaping by putting in statues or other art, re-doing the pavement of their driveway, planting trees, or getting a water feature.

The visual appeal of any garden can be tremendously improved by just adding a water fountain. A true fantasyland can be created from what used to be a very simple spot. The ambiance of your garden will be very different once you install a water fountain, as the calming sounds of the water will create an oasis for you as well as for the friendly birds and animals it will attract. Your fountain will promptly turn into the main feature of your garden or yard.

The Influence of the Norman Conquest on Anglo-Saxon Gardens

The Anglo-Saxon way of life was drastically changed by the appearance of the Normans in the later eleventh century. At the time of the conquest, the Normans surpassed the Anglo-Saxons in building design and cultivation. But the Normans had to pacify the whole territory before they could concentrate on home life, domestic architecture, and decoration. Castles were more standard constructions and often constructed on blustery hills, where their people devoted both time and space to practicing offense and defense, while monasteries were large stone buildings, mostly situated in the widest, most fruitful hollows. Peaceful activities such as gardening were out of place in these desolate citadels. Berkeley Castle, maybe the most pristine model of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture, still exists today.

The keep is said to date from the time of William the Conqueror. As a technique of deterring assailants from tunneling beneath the walls, an immense terrace surrounds the building. One of these terraces, a charming bowling green, is covered grass and flanked by an old yew hedge cut into the figure of crude battlements.


The Most Recent Inclusion to the Chatsworth Gardens: "Revelation" Fountain
“Revelation,” the most recent addition to the beautiful garden fountains of Chatsworth, was planned by recognized British sculptor Angela Conner. She was delegated by the deceased 11th Duke of Devonshire to make a limited... read more
Builders of the First Outside Garden Fountains
Often serving as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and highly educated scholars all in one, from the 16th to the late 18th century, fountain designers were multi-faceted individuals, Exemplifying the Renaissance artist as a... read more
Bernini's Outdoor Fountains
There are many famous fountains in Rome’s city center. One of the greatest sculptors and artists of the 17th century, nearly all of them were... read more
Original Water Supply Techniques in Rome
Rome’s very first elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in 273 BC; prior to that, inhabitants living at higher elevations had to rely on local springs for their water. When aqueducts or springs weren’t easily... read more