How Feng Shui Make Your Garden into an Oasis

Introduce feng shui design to the layout of your yard so it can bring energy into your residence. a_544__26466.jpg

Do not be concerned if your garden is considered too little for feng shui design, as size is relatively unimportant. If you have a lush, charming one, that is great, but even a smaller area works well with feng shui design.

Whether you are bringing feng shui design to your home or garden, the tools are the same. Since the energy map, or bagua, of your garden is an extension of your house’s bagua, you will need to start off by understanding the bagua of the house.

In order to make the most of feng shui, it is crucial to start by comprehending how to bolster each of its five elements.

The northeast corner of your garden, for instance, connects to personal growth and self-cultivation energy, and Earth is the feng shui element that is necessary to integrate it. A perfect addition to the northeast corner of your yard might be a serene Zen garden decorated with natural stone, as they represent the Earth element in feng shui.

Anyone thinking about including a water feature into their garden should place it in one of these feng shui areas: North (career & path in life), Southeast (money and abundance), or East (health & family).

Water Fountains: A Must Have in any Japanese Gardens

A water feature is an important part of any Japanese garden. They tend to be placed right at the entrance of Japanese temples and homes because they are regarded as being representative of spiritual and physical cleansing. Since water is the most essential component of any Japanese fountain, the design is normally simple.

Bamboo is a popular material to use for spouts and therefore often added into water fountains. Underneath the bamboo spout is generally a stone basin which receives the water as it trickles down from the spout. It must have a worn-down, weathered appearance as well. It is essential that the overall look of the fountain fits in with the natural surroundings, so people typically place plants, rocks, and flowers around it. Needless to say, this fountain is something more than just a simple decoration.

If you want to get a bit more imaginative, try a stone fountain enhanced with live bamboo and other natural elements placed on a bed of gravel. After some years it begins to really blend into the surrounding nature as moss covers the stone.

If you are fortunate enough to have a big piece of open land you can create a water feature that is much more elaborate.

Think about adding a delightful final touch like a pond filled with koi or a tiny stream.

However, water does not have to be an element in a Japanese water fountain. Lots of people decide to represent water with sand, gravel, or rocks rather than putting in actual water. In addition, flat stones can be laid out close enough together to create the impression of a rippling brook.

The Famous Revelation Garden Fountain at the Gardens of Chatsworth

“Revelation,” the most recent addition to the decorative outdoor fountains of Chatsworth, was created by well-known British sculptor Angela Conner. In celebration of the Queen’s 80th birthday, she was mandated by the late 11th Duke of Devonshire to build a limited edition bust of Queen Elizabeth designed of brass and steel in 2004. Jack Pond, one of Chatsworth’s earliest ponds, had “Revelation” put up in 1999. It takes the configuration of four large petals designed of metal which opens and close with the water circulation, alternatively concealing and exposing a gold colored globe at the sculpture’s heart. A gold dust decorated metal globe was created and included into the prominent sculpture standing five meters high and five meters in width. This most recent water fountain is a fascinating addition to the Gardens at Chatsworth because the petals’ movement is totally powered by water.

Delight in the Unique Design of the Cascade Fountain at Chatsworth Garden

The Cascade garden fountain creates a amazing garden focal point at the back of Chatsworth House. Twenty-four irregularly spaced stone steps in a series stretch 200 yards towards the house and all the way down the hillside. Based mostly on a 17th century French design, the Cascade is also entirely gravity fed. This water fountain has been kept unchanged after being designed for the first Duke of Devonshire in 1696. The Cascade House overlooks the fountain, where water gently flows downward.

A small building, the home is embellished on the exterior with marine creatures in bas-relief. Just before continuing down the Cascade, on unique occasions water pressure to the Cascade can easily be boosted, causing the Cascade House to become a part of the Cascade display, as water circulates through channel on its roof and originating from the jaws of its carved marine creatures. The size of every step was made slightly different and means that the sound of the water falling may vary as it falls down the Cascades, providing a wonderful and wonderful complement to a stroll through the gardens. Back in 2004, Chatsworth's Cascade was recognized by historians at Country Life as the best water feature in England.

Water Fountains: Four Legged Friends, Flying Friends and You

Outdoor water features and bird feeders are a healthy way to draw in wildlife and pets. The truth is that birds require water to: drink, bathe and preen. Birds including robins, thrushes, orioles, or warblers prefer the flow of water from a fountain and are not necessarily drawn to bird feeders. Birds are usually drawn to outdoor fountains because of their flowing water rather than the standing water found in bowl-shaped bird baths. Trickling fountains which spatter water have a more noticeable sound, this attracting even more birds.

As dog owners will agree these outdoor fountains are a great water source for the four-legged creatures. During scorching months of summer, cats and dogs will be outdoors for the absolute freshest water around. Because water in fountains is consistently moving, they do not need much maintenance, whereas the still water of birdbaths collect debris and require more care.


"Old School" Fountain Manufacturers
Often serving as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and highly educated scholars all in one, from the 16th to the later part of the 18th century, fountain designers were... read more
Rome’s First Water Transport Solutions
With the manufacturing of the first raised aqueduct in Rome, the Aqua Anio Vetus in 273 BC, individuals who lived on the city’s hills no longer had to depend solely on naturally-occurring... read more
Rome’s Ingenious Water Transport Systems
Aqua Anio Vetus, the first raised aqueduct built in Rome, started supplying the people living in the hills with water in 273 BC, although they had counted on natural springs up till then. If inhabitants residing at higher elevations did not... read more
The First Public Water Features recorded in Human History.
The water from creeks and other sources was initially provided to the citizens of nearby communities and municipalities by way of water fountains, whose design was largely practical, not artistic.... read more