The Earliest Public Water Fountains

The water from creeks and other sources was originally delivered to the occupants of nearby communities and municipalities by way of water fountains, whose purpose was primarily practical, not aesthetic. A supply of water higher in elevation than the fountain was necessary to pressurize the movement and send water squirting from the fountain's spout, a technology without equal until the late 19th century. ft_170__93234.jpg Striking and spectacular, prominent water fountains have been designed as memorials in most civilizations. The contemporary fountains of today bear little similarity to the first water fountains. Basic stone basins crafted from nearby rock were the original fountains, used for spiritual functions and drinking water. The earliest stone basins are thought to be from around 2000 BC. The force of gravity was the energy source that operated the earliest water fountains. These historic water fountains were built to be functional, often situated along reservoirs, streams and rivers to furnish drinking water. Fountains with ornamental Gods, mythological monsters, and creatures began to appear in Rome in about 6 BC, made from rock and bronze. A well-engineered system of reservoirs and aqueducts kept Rome's public water fountains supplied with fresh water.

The Origins Of Outdoor Fountains

The incredible architecture of a fountain allows it to provide clean water or shoot water high into air for dramatic effect and it can also serve as an excellent design feature to enhance your home.

The central purpose of a fountain was originally strictly practical. Water fountains were connected to a spring or aqueduct to provide potable water as well as bathing water for cities, townships and villages. Up to the late 19th century, water fountains had to be near an aqueduct or reservoir and more elevated than the fountain so that gravity could make the water move downwards or jet high into the air. Fountains were an excellent source of water, and also served to decorate living areas and celebrate the artist. Bronze or stone masks of wildlife and heroes were commonly seen on Roman fountains. During the Middle Ages, Muslim and Moorish garden designers included fountains in their designs to mimic the gardens of paradise.

To demonstrate his dominance over nature, French King Louis XIV included fountains in the Garden of Versailles. To mark the entrance of the restored Roman aqueducts, the Popes of the 17th and 18th centuries commissioned the building of baroque style fountains in the spot where the aqueducts entered the city of Rome

Indoor plumbing became the main source of water by the end of the 19th century thereby limiting urban fountains to mere decorative elements. Gravity was replaced by mechanical pumps in order to enable fountains to bring in clean water and allow for beautiful water displays.

Beautifying city parks, honoring people or events and entertaining, are some of the functions of modern-day fountains.

Consider Buying a Contained Water Feature for Your Garden

Self-Contained fountains are inexpensive and simple to install and are therefore quite common. The plumbing, pump, and other components come with the fountain. Fountains that have their own water resource are also referred to as “self-contained”.

If you are looking for an easy-to-install water fountain for a veranda or deck, a self-contained model is definitely for you. Due to the fact that they are easily moveable, it is easy to change their location whenever you want.

Once you determine where you want to put your fountain, your landscaper should verify that it is not too bumpy or uneven. If your landscaper thinks the ground is too bumpy, he can always even it out it for you. The next step is to put your water feature in place and add some water. The only thing remaining to do is to connect it to a power source such as batteries, a wall socket, or a solar panel, and it will be operational.

The best option for anyone who wants mobility and does not want to use external plumbing or water source is a self-contained fountain. Lots of people place them in the middle of the garden, but they can really go anywhere. You purchase them in myriad different materials such as cast stone, metal, ceramic, and fiberglass.

Keeping Your Outdoor Garden Fountain Clean

Water fountains will last a very long time with scheduled cleaning and maintenance.

It is easy for foreign objects to find their way into outside fountains, so keeping it clean is vital. On top of that, algae can be a challenge, as sunshine hitting the water permits it to form easily. In order to prevent this, there are some common ingredients that can be poured into the water, such as vinegar, sea salt, or hydrogen peroxide. There are those who like to use bleach, but that is hazardous to any animals that might drink or bathe in the water - so should therefore be avoided.

Every 3-4 months, garden fountains should go through a decent cleaning. First off you must remove the water. When you have done this, scour inside the water reservoir with a gentle detergent. If there is delicate artwork, you might need to use a toothbrush for those hard-to-reach areas. Any soap residue remaining on your fountain can harm it, so be sure it is all rinsed off.

Numerous organisms and calcium deposits can get inside the pump, so it is advised to take it apart and clean it thoroughly. You might want to let it soak in vinegar for a few hours to make it quicker to scrub. Build-up can be a big problem, so use mineral or rain water over tap water, when possible, to eliminate this dilemma.

One final tip for keeping your fountain in top working order is to check the water level every day and make sure it is full. If the water level slides below the pump’s intake level, it can harm the pump and cause it to burn out - something you do not want to happen!

Aqueducts: The Remedy to Rome's Water Challenges

Aqua Anio Vetus, the first raised aqueduct built in Rome, began providing the individuals living in the hills with water in 273 BC, even though they had depended on natural springs up till then. If citizens residing at higher elevations did not have accessibility to springs or the aqueduct, they’d have to count on the other existing techniques of the day, cisterns that accumulated rainwater from the sky and subterranean wells that received the water from under ground. To supply water to Pincian Hill in the early sixteenth century, they implemented the new tactic of redirecting the flow from the Acqua Vergine aqueduct’s underground network. As originally constructed, the aqueduct was provided along the length of its channel with pozzi (manholes) constructed at regular intervals. The manholes made it more straightforward to thoroughly clean the channel, but it was also achievable to use buckets to remove water from the aqueduct, as we witnessed with Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi when he possessed the property from 1543 to 1552, the year he passed away.

Though the cardinal also had a cistern to accumulate rainwater, it couldn't produce sufficient water. By using an opening to the aqueduct that flowed below his property, he was in a position to reach his water desires.


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