Where did Large Outdoor Fountains Come From?

a-473__78514.jpg The amazing or decorative effect of a fountain is just one of the purposes it fulfills, as well as delivering drinking water and adding a decorative touch to your property.

Originally, fountains only served a functional purpose. Water fountains were connected to a spring or aqueduct to provide drinkable water as well as bathing water for cities, townships and villages. Up to the late nineteenth century, water fountains had to be near an aqueduct or reservoir and higher than the fountain so that gravity could make the water move down or jet high into the air. Fountains were not only utilized as a water source for drinking water, but also to decorate homes and celebrate the artist who created it. The main materials used by the Romans to create their fountains were bronze or stone masks, mostly illustrating animals or heroes. Throughout the Middle Ages, Muslim and Moorish garden planners incorporated fountains to create mini depictions of the gardens of paradise. King Louis XIV of France wanted to demonstrate his superiority over nature by including fountains in the Gardens of Versailles. Seventeen and 18 century Popes sought to exalt their positions by adding decorative baroque-style fountains at the point where restored Roman aqueducts arrived into the city.

Indoor plumbing became the key source of water by the end of the 19th century thereby restricting urban fountains to mere decorative elements. The creation of special water effects and the recycling of water were 2 things made possible by replacing gravity with mechanical pumps.

Modern fountains are used to adorn community spaces, honor individuals or events, and enhance recreational and entertainment events.

The History of the Beautiful Cascade Water Feature at Chatsworth Garden

The Cascade garden fountain creates an incredible garden focal point at the back of Chatsworth House. Twenty-four irregularly spaced stone steps stretch down the hillside for 200 yards towards the residence. Based on a 17th century French concept, the Cascade is also entirely gravity fed. In 1696, this water fountain was built for the first Duke of Devonshire and has stayed unaltered ever since that time. The Cascade House stands at the peak of the fountain where water spills downward. Ornamented on the outside with ocean creatures in bas-relief, the dwelling is a small construction. Before proceeding down the Cascade, on important occasions water pressure to the Cascade can easily be boosted, causing the Cascade House to become an element of the Cascade spectacle, as water flows through channel on its rooftop and from the jaws of its carved ocean creatures. The sounds of the water cascading varies as it falls down the Cascades because of the slight variance in the size of each and every step thereby supplying a great and soothing complement to a walking through the gardens.

Back in 2004, Chatsworth's Cascade was chosen by historians at Country Life as the best water fountain in England.

How Many Variations of Backyard Water Fountains Can I Pick From?

Gardens allow you to retreat into nature and be outside anytime you want. There is nothing as beautiful as one to unwind in, something you can keep in mind when you are working to get it set up. Investing in a beautiful garden is good, as it will enhance the “curb appeal” and value of your home. A water feature is not the only way to improve your landscape; consider adding trees and bushes, paving your driveway, or even putting in some special statues.

A water fountain can drastically alter the aesthetics of a garden. A place of balance and serenity will appear from what was at first just a simple spot. The ambiance of your garden will be very different once you install a water fountain, as the calming sounds of the water will create an oasis for you as well as for the friendly birds and animals it will attract. Your fountain will immediately turn into the main feature of your garden or yard.

Why Your Your Furry Friends and Visiting Birds Enjoy Fountains

Wildlife and pets are naturally attracted to bird feeders and water fountains. The truth is that birds require water to: drink, bathe and preen.

Birds including robins, thrushes, orioles, or warblers favor the flow of water from a fountain and are not necessarily drawn to bird feeders. Birds are usually drawn to outdoor fountains because of their moving water rather than the standing water found in bowl-shaped bird baths. Birds hear the trickling and splashing and are even more likely to come around.

Dogs are drawn to fountains mainly because they provide another source of water. Dogs and cats will be outside looking out for refreshing water during hot temperatures. Also, regularly coursing water fountains require less maintenance than the still water of a birdbath that tend to get dirtier.

Water Elements: A Must in any Japanese Gardens

You will seldom see a Japanese garden that does not have a water element. The Japanese water fountain is considered representative of spiritual and physical purifying, so it is typically placed in or near the doorways of temples or homes. The design of Japanese fountains tends to be very simplistic because they are meant to draw attention to the water itself.

Many people also choose a water fountain that features a bamboo spout. Below the bamboo spout is usually a stone basin which receives the water as it flows down from the spout.

In addition, it is vital to the overall look that it appear as if it has been outdoors for a long time. Natural elements such as plants and rocks are commonly put in place around a fountain so that it seems more connected with nature. Clearly this fountain is much more than merely a pretty add-on.

For something a bit more distinctive, start with a bed of gravel, add a stone fountain, and then embellish it imaginatively with live bamboo and other natural elements. In time, as moss slowly covers the stones, it becomes even more natural-looking.

Wherever there is sufficient open space, you have the possibility to build a more extensive water feature. Popular water feature additions are a koi pond or any sort of little pool, or even a wandering brook.

Water, though, does not have to be used in a Japanese fountain. Attractive rocks, sand, or gravel are ideal alternatives to actual water, as they can be used to represent the water. You can also collect flat stones and place them close enough together that they look like water in motion.


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