Enrich Your Garden with the Aid of Feng Shui

Experience the health benefits of feng shui by adding its design elements into your yard. ft-191__22334.jpg

Size is not the primary factor when incorporating feng shui design to your yard. If you have a lush, eye-catching one, that is great, but even a small area works well with feng shui design.

Feng shui tools are identical whether you are working in your garden or your house. The initial task is to know the bagua, or energy map, of your home, as your garden’s bagua will be an extension of that.

There are five elements in feng shui theory, and you should know how to apply each of them to maximize the energy.

Feng shui design calls for the Earth element, for example, to be incorporated into the northeastern corner of your garden, as that area connects to self-cultivation and personal growth energy. A Zen garden with some pretty natural rocks is perfect for that spot, as the rocks represent the Earth element.

Think about incorporating a water feature into these feng shui areas: East (health & family), North (career & path in life), or Southeast (money and abundance).

Factors to Consider When Installing a Garden Fountain

A water source and an electrical socket are two important items that many people do not think about when determining where they want to place their garden fountain. Sometimes new owners get so caught up in the romance of their new purchase that they forget important details. Most power cords are 12 feet long and require a 120v outdoor electrical outlet, though an extension cord can always be added. Install your fountain in a place close to a water source as you will need to fill it. Hauling water is hard and laborious. A nearby water hose is handy when time comes to fill the fountain. If you have an specialist on hand, you may want to look into getting a water fountain autofill with a connection to an external water line, as this would be much less difficult in the long run.

An Intro to Herbs in The Garden

Lots of gardeners are drawn to natural herbs because they can utilize them in so many different foods. These plants are easy to grow and have the appeal of instant gratification, as they can be used in soups, marinades, and other recipes. Though you may believe you have to get out and prune every day with an herb garden this is not true, but even better you can keep it going all year long by moving your pots inside in the fall. You can integrate a lot of things in your garden, including perennial herbs especially because they do not need replanting at the end of the year and don't perish easily. In addition, the sorts of herbs you prefer to cook with should affect your personal herb selection. Take into account the cuisine you prefer when picking out which herbs to plant in your garden. For instance, if you cook a lot of Italian food you may want to plant basil and oregano. If you like Latin food, select cilantro. The placement of your herb garden will identify what herbs can be planted and how long they will thrive. It will be least difficult to plant straight into the ground if your environment is on the milder side, with seasons that are not severe. This is a great way to spruce up your garden without having the pain of investing in or creating planters.

If you do not want to your plants to die or become dormant after becoming exposed to overwhelming weather conditions, you can still rely on planters. They are practical and flexible and you can relocate indoors at any time.

From Where Did Landscape Fountains Begin?

The incredible construction of a fountain allows it to provide clean water or shoot water high into air for dramatic effect and it can also serve as an excellent design feature to complement your home.

The main purpose of a fountain was originally strictly practical. Residents of urban areas, townships and small towns used them as a source of drinking water and a place to wash, which meant that fountains needed to be connected to nearby aqueduct or spring. Up until the 19th century, fountains had to be more elevated and closer to a water source, such as aqueducts and reservoirs, in order to benefit from gravity which fed the fountains. Artists thought of fountains as amazing additions to a living space, however, the fountains also served to supply clean water and honor the artist responsible for building it. Roman fountains often depicted imagery of animals or heroes made of metal or stone masks. Muslims and Moorish garden designers of the Middle Ages included fountains to re-create smaller versions of the gardens of paradise. King Louis XIV of France wanted to illustrate his dominion over nature by including fountains in the Gardens of Versailles. Seventeen and 18 century Popes sought to exalt their positions by including decorative baroque-style fountains at the point where restored Roman aqueducts arrived into the city.

Indoor plumbing became the key source of water by the end of the 19th century thereby limiting urban fountains to mere decorative elements.

Gravity was replaced by mechanical pumps in order to permit fountains to bring in clean water and allow for beautiful water displays.

These days, fountains decorate public areas and are used to recognize individuals or events and fill recreational and entertainment needs.

A Few Good Techniques to Put up a Wall Water Element

Just about any living space will benefit from the inclusion of a wall fountain. The calming sound of the waterfall will relax and sooth. While any room will benefit from a wall fountain, they are most often hung in foyers. The best way to mount one depends on the design, but the standard process is the same. Be sure that all the various pieces are used in building it. It will be necessary to connect the pump and tubing, and the base will need to be connected to the top section. It is advisable to carefully review the directions before you begin the assembly process. Generally, it is quick and uncomplicated. Be aware, though, that the style you have might call for a somewhat different process. Another person can be useful to hold the wall fountain in the right position so that you can mark the wall. To guarantee it will be straight, use a level. Mark the spot where you want the very top of the wall fountain as well as the bottom. Wall fountains can be mounted in more than just one way. You can place the screws in the wall and slide them into the holes on the back of the wall fountain. Alternatively, you could install brackets to the wall and use those. The second option is best, especially for larger wall fountains. Mark the point on the wall where the brackets need to be attached. Use a drill to make the pilot holes on the wall for your drywall anchors. Put the anchors in the wall with a hammer. The brackets can then be mounted on the wall using a screwdriver or cordless drill. It is then time to place your wall fountain onto the mounting brackets.

Check to see that it is in the ideal position and safely on the brackets. If the position is correct, it’s time to add some water. The pump should be completely submerged under water. The water will start to circulate as soon as you plug in your fountain. The water should fill the basin to within an inch of the very top. Be aware that it will overflow when not pumping if you fill it to the very top. When the pump is off the water all settles at the bottom of the basin, causing the water level to rise. Harm can be caused if the water is overly full and spills down your wall.


The Last Inclusion to the Chatsworth Gardens: Revelation Fountain
Created by popular English sculptor Angela Conner, "Revelation" is the latest addition to the Chatsworth ornamental garden water features. In celebration of the Queen’s 80th birthday... read more
Fountains And Their Use In Ancient Minoa
A variety of different kinds of conduits have been unveiled through archaeological digs on the isle of Crete, the birthplace of Minoan society. They not only aided with the water supply, they removed rainwater and wastewater as well. The majority... read more
Ancient Greece: The Roots of Garden Statue Design
Nearly all sculptors were paid by the temples to enhance the intricate pillars and archways with renderings of the gods until the stage came to a close and many Greeks started to think of their religion as superstitious rather than sacred, when... read more