Outdoor Water Features: A Beautiful Way to Honor a Special Person

For a cherished one you have lost, a garden fountain could make a wonderful memorial. Age-old traditions are commonly met with resistance nowadays. That said, people still commonly have some kind of memorial for loved ones who have passed. Some memorials might include a number of personal items. 94-152-1801__19618.jpg They come in many shapes and sizes, and backyard garden fountains are really common. You can personalize it in many ways such as including a nameplate, having yearly memorial services around the fountain, planting flowers nearby, or including a framed photo.

Garden fountains help you to honor loved ones you have lost. Prosperity, achievement, and good fortune all are represented by the running water which celebrates the memory of the defunct. In order to last a long time, your garden fountain should be well made, sturdy, and resistant to bad weather. After you do the work to set up the garden fountain memorial, you will want to be certain it will last.

Rome’s Ingenious Water Transport Systems

With the construction of the first elevated aqueduct in Rome, the Aqua Anio Vetus in 273 BC, folks who lived on the city’s hillsides no longer had to be dependent exclusively on naturally-occurring spring water for their requirements. Outside of these aqueducts and springs, wells and rainwater-collecting cisterns were the lone techniques readily available at the time to supply water to spots of greater elevation. Starting in the sixteenth century, a unique program was introduced, using Acqua Vergine’s subterranean segments to supply water to Pincian Hill. As originally constructed, the aqueduct was provided along the length of its channel with pozzi (manholes) constructed at regular intervals.

Although they were originally designed to make it possible to support the aqueduct, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi started using the manholes to gather water from the channel, starting when he obtained the property in 1543. He didn’t get enough water from the cistern that he had constructed on his property to gather rainwater. Via an opening to the aqueduct that ran underneath his property, he was in a position to fulfill his water demands.

Where did Landscape Fountains Originate from?

A fountain, an incredible piece of engineering, not only supplies drinking water as it pours into a basin, it can also propel water high into the air for a noteworthy effect.

The central purpose of a fountain was originally strictly practical. Cities, towns and villages made use of nearby aqueducts or springs to supply them with potable water as well as water where they could bathe or wash. Up to the late 19th century, water fountains had to be near an aqueduct or reservoir and more elevated than the fountain so that gravity could make the water move down or jet high into the air. Serving as an element of adornment and celebration, fountains also provided clean, fresh drinking water. Bronze or stone masks of wildlife and heroes were commonly seen on Roman fountains. Muslims and Moorish landscaping designers of the Middle Ages included fountains to re-create smaller models of the gardens of paradise. King Louis XIV of France wanted to illustrate his superiority over nature by including fountains in the Gardens of Versailles.

The Romans of the 17th and 18th centuries manufactured baroque decorative fountains to glorify the Popes who commissioned them as well as to mark the spot where the restored Roman aqueducts entered the city.

Urban fountains created at the end of the nineteenth functioned only as decorative and celebratory adornments since indoor plumbing provided the necessary drinking water. Amazing water effects and recycled water were made possible by replacing the power of gravity with mechanical pumps.

Nowadays, fountains decorate public spaces and are used to honor individuals or events and fill recreational and entertainment needs.

Integrate the Benefit of Feng Shui into Your Garden

When applied to your yard, feng shui design will draw its healthy energy into your home as well.

As far as the size of your yard goes, it is not extremely important when adding feng shui design to it. It is terrific to have a huge space to work with, but do not worry if the area is small since you can always introduce feng shui design.

Feng shui tools are identical whether you are working in your garden or your residence. Since the energy map, or bagua, of your garden is an extension of your home's bagua, you will need to begin by understanding the bagua of the house.

Before getting started, make sure you grasp the five elements of feng shui so that you can maximize their energy.

An example of this is that Earth is the feng shui element you should have in the northeast section of your garden because that part of your garden connects to the energy of personal growth and self-cultivation. Since rocks symbolize the Earth element in feng shui, you might give some thought to putting some into a peaceful Zen garden in the northeast corner of your yard.

Anyone thinking about adding a water element into their garden should place it in one of these feng shui areas: North (career & path in life), Southeast (money and abundance), or East (health & family).

Where are the Planet's Most Impressive Water Features?

The King Fahd Fountain (built in 1985) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, has the tallest consistently-running fountain on the planet. The water reaches the fantastic height of 260 meters (853 feet) over the Red Sea.

The Han-Gang River in Seoul, Korea (2002), comes in second with water heights of 202 meters (663 feet).

Located next to the Mississippi River in St. Louis, Missouri, is 3rd placed Gateway Geyser (1995). Regarded as the tallest fountain in the United States, it propels water 192 meters (630 feet) into the sky.

Next is the fountain located in Karachi, Pakistan (Port Fountain) which shoots water up to 190 meters (620 feet) in height.

Number 4 is Water at Fountain Park (1970) situated in Fountain Hills, Arizona - it can attain up to 171 meters (561 feet) when all three pumps are working, even though it normally only hits up to 91 meters (300 feet).

The Dubai Fountain was opened in 2009 next to Burj Khalifa - the world's tallest building. The fountain propels water up to 73 meters (240 feet) and performs once every half hour to pre-recorded music - and even has extreme shooters, not used in every show, which reach up to 150 meters (490 feet).

Built in 1970, the Captain James Cook Memorial Jet in Canberra, Australia, comes in at number 7 shooting water up to 147 meters (482 feet).

The last impressive fountain to make the list is the Jet d’Eau (1951) in Geneva, Switzerland, measuring 140 meters (460 feet).


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