Improve Your Backyard with the Aid of Feng Shui

Add feng shui design to the layout of your yard so it can bring energy into your home.

Size is not the primary concern when adding feng shui design to your garden. If you have a lush, eye-catching one, that is great, but even a small area works well with feng shui design.

The same tools you employ to include feng shui design into your home can be used in the garden. twf102__25055.jpg Your yard's bagua, or energy map, is an off-shoot of your house's bagua, so it is essential to figure out your home’s first.

There are five elements in feng shui theory, and you should learn how to use each of them to maximize the energy.

An example of this is that Earth is the feng shui element you should have in the northeast section of your garden because that part of your garden connects to the energy of personal growth and self-cultivation. A perfect addition to the northeast corner of your yard might be a peaceful Zen garden decorated with natural stone, as they represent the Earth element in feng shui.

A water element is a suitable add-on to the following feng shui areas: Southeast (money & abundance), East (health & family), and North (career & path in life).

Contemporary Statuary in Ancient Greece

Though the majority of sculptors were compensated by the temples to decorate the elaborate columns and archways with renderings of the gods, as the time period came to a close, it became more prevalent for sculptors to represent common people as well mainly because many of Greeks had started to think of their religion as superstitious rather than sacred. Portraiture started to be prevalent as well, and would be welcomed by the Romans when they conquered the Greeks, and sometimes wealthy families would order a depiction of their progenitors to be positioned inside their huge familial tombs. It is amiss to think that the arts had one function throughout The Classical Greek period, a time period of creative advancement during which the usage of sculpture and other art forms evolved. It could be the modern quality of Greek sculpture that grabs our eye today; it was on a leading-edge practice of the ancient world whether it was made for religious purposes or aesthetic pleasure.

The Most Recent Inclusion to the Gardens of Chatsworth: Revelation Fountain

Angela Conner, the reputable British sculptor, crafted “Revelation,” the newest addition to the decorative outdoor fountains of Chatsworth. The late 11th Duke of Devonshire mandated her, due to her work in brass and steel, to make a limited edition bust of Queen Elizabeth in commemoration of the Queen’s 80th birthday. “Revelation” was put up in 1999 in Jack Pond, one of Chatsworth’s earliest ponds. It takes the configuration of four large petals crafted from steel which opens and closes with the water circulation, alternatively concealing and displaying a golden globe at the sculpture’s center. A metallic globe finished with gold dust was incorporated into the sculpture, which rests five meters in height and five meters wide. This newest water feature is an exciting and interesting addition to the Gardens of Chatsworth, because the movement of flower petals is completely operated by water.

Water Transport Strategies in Early Rome

Rome’s 1st elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in 273 BC; prior to that, inhabitants living at higher elevations had to rely on local creeks for their water.

If residents residing at higher elevations did not have access to springs or the aqueduct, they’d have to count on the remaining existing techniques of the time, cisterns that accumulated rainwater from the sky and subterranean wells that received the water from under ground. To provide water to Pincian Hill in the early sixteenth century, they applied the emerging strategy of redirecting the stream from the Acqua Vergine aqueduct’s underground channel. Pozzi, or manholes, were built at standard intervals along the aqueduct’s channel. Though they were initially designed to make it possible to service the aqueduct, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi began using the manholes to collect water from the channel, opening when he obtained the property in 1543. It seems that, the rainwater cistern on his property wasn’t sufficient to fulfill his needs. Fortunately, the aqueduct sat directly below his residence, and he had a shaft established to give him access.

The Outcome of the Norman Conquest on Anglo-Saxon Gardens

The Anglo-Saxon way of life was drastically changed by the introduction of the Normans in the later eleventh century. The Normans were much better than the Anglo-Saxons at architecture and horticulture when they came into power. But before focusing on home-life or having the occasion to consider domestic architecture or decoration, the Normans had to subjugate an entire society. Monasteries and castles served different purposes, so while monasteries were large stone structures assembled in only the most productive, wide dales, castles were set upon blustery knolls where the people focused on learning offensive and defensive strategies. The tranquil method of gardening was unlikely in these dismal bastions. Berkeley Castle is most likely the most unchanged model in existence today of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture. The keep is said to date from William the Conqueror's time. A big terrace recommended for strolling and as a means to stop enemies from mining below the walls runs around the building.

On one of these parapets is a picturesque bowling green covered in grass and bordered by an aged hedge of yew that has been designed into coarse battlements.


Chatsworth Gardens and its "Revelation" Waterworks
“Revelation,” the latest addition to the ornamental garden fountains of Chatsworth, was developed by well-known British sculptor Angela Conner. The late 11th Duke of Devonshire mandated her, because of her work in brass and steel, to design a... read more
Garden Water Fountains And Public Health
Berkley, CA citizens voted for a sugar-sweetened beverages tax in February 2014, the earliest of its kind in the United States. The purpose is to get everyone drinking more water and other natural... read more
The Early, Largely Ignored, Water-Moving System
The compliments Agrippa’s water-lifting invention was given from Andrea Bacci in 1588 was short-lived. It could be that the Acqua Felice, the second of Rome’s... read more